Pakistani Students Win the MIT’s Medical Aid for Finding a Low Cost Ventilator

Pakistani Students Win the MIT’s Medical Aid for Finding a Low Cost Ventilator

Despite limited resources and access to advanced technology, talented Pakistanis have the ability to name themselves and their country. A team of Pakistani students won the first prize at the MIT Sloan Healthcare Innovations Prize 2019 to find a fan cheap.

Pakistani Students Win the MIT’s Medical Aid for Finding a Low Cost Ventilator

Pakistani Students Win the MIT’s Medical Aid for Finding a Low Cost Ventilator
Pakistani Students Win the MIT’s Medical Aid for Finding a Low Cost Ventilator

Compared to normal fans who cost $ 15,000, the invented device Umbulizer costs only $ 2,000.

The Team:-

Out Of the 8 finalists in the event compiled in Wong Auditorium Sloan Sloan, a team of Umbulizer graduated from Boston University Shaheer Paracha, alumni of MIT Moiz Imam Abdur Rahman Akkas, student medical school Harvard Sanchay Gupta, a student of mechanical engineering at MIT Wasay received feedback, New Farzan Khan, a graduate of York University in Abu Dhabi, and Boston Rohan Jadeja University student, received the first prize of $ 20,000.

Pakistani Students Win the MIT’s Medical Aid for Finding a Low Cost Ventilator
Pakistani Students Win the MIT’s Medical Aid for Finding a Low Cost Ventilator

The low cost of the fan is explained by the fact that it has four major functions that are needed in rescue situations, while traditional fans have 15 functions that are rarely used.

Umbilzer in Pakistan?

The device is easy to work with a single tube and also works with batteries for greater mobility. The first clinical results are encouraging and the students are planning to launch the device in Pakistan.

According to Paracha, despite a population of over 200 million, Pakistan has only 2,000 supporters.

When we spoke to Pakistani doctors and hospital administrators, they expressed a need for a device that is simple to operate, capable of remote monitoring, portable, and built using locally sourced material. All of those considerations have informed our [first iteration of this machine].

Paracha said the prize money will be used for current clinical trials and if it works in Pakistan, see a market in underdeveloped countries in South America, Africa and South Asia, where every year about 2 million people die from respiratory illnesses. This can be prevented.

Competitive advantage lies in device portability and affordability combined with the consistency and accuracy of traditional fans.

The need for an affordable fan is at hand as respiratory diseases are one of the most common causes of death in more than 60 developing countries around the world.

Also Read:Mohammad Amir Leaves the Kings of Karachi and Returns to Pakistan

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